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Morocco Travel Tips 

Time Zone

  • GMT

 

Language

  • Arabic is the official language, Berber (another dialect) and French are widely spoken while English is understood in most Moroccan cities.

English French

Good morning

Bonjour

Good evening

Bonsoir

Goodbye

Au revoir

Please

S'il vous plaît

Thank you

Merci

Yes

Oui

No

Non

Water

Eau

Good

Bien

Money

Argent

How much?

Combien?

Where is?

Où est?

OK

D'accord





 

English Moroccan Dialect

Good morning

Sabah al kheyr

Good evening

Masa al kheyr

Goodbye

B'slama

Please

Aafak

Thank you

Shukran

Yes

Naam

No

La

Water

Ma

Good

Mezyan

Money

F'lous

How much

B'shhal?

Where is?

Fein?

OK

Wakha





 

Religion

  • Morocco is predominantly Muslim with Jewish and Christian minorities. 

  • Ramadan (Fasting Month) is observed once a year. In 2013, this falls between 10th July and 7th August. During Ramadan, locals may not eat in public and will not be served in restaurants and cafes. Tourists may eat in public, although it is recommended that eating inside is more appropriate to show respect to the local culture.

 

Currency

  • The Moroccan Dirham, code (MAD) and symbol (Dh), is equal to 100 centimes. 

  • Notes are in denominations of Dh200, 100, 50, 20 and 10. Coins are in denominations of Dh10, 5 and 1, and 50, 20, 10 and 5 centimes.

 

Money Matters

  • ATMs can be found in all cities and most towns. 

  • Major credit cards are accepted in larger shops, hotels and restaurants.

 

Tipping

  • If you are travelling on an independent itinerary and the cost of your programme does not include gratuities, we suggest the following guidelines for a city tour:

  • Guides full day 150 MAD ($20)

  • Guides half day 100 MAD ($13)

  • Driver full day 100 MAD ($13)

  • Driver half day 50 MAD ($6)

  • Taxi drivers do not expect tips but it is polite to round up the figure.

  • Service charge is sometimes added to restaurant bills. If it is not, a typical gratuity would be 10%.

  • Tips for airport and hotel porters are sometimes included in our airport transfers.

 

Weather

Clothing

  • Travellers should bear in mind that Morocco is a predominantly Muslim country, and so, out of respect, women should refrain from wearing anything too revealing when walking around town.

Health

  • Although it is safe to do so in most big cities, it is always advisable not to drink tap water or eat raw vegetables, especially in Desert areas. Bottled mineral water is available throughout the country.

  • Many hotels claim to have a no-smoking policy, please be aware that this policy is not always enforced and you will almost always still find an ashtray in the room.

  • Pharmacies are open Monday to Friday, and Saturday morning but closed on Sundays. In case of emergency, contact the reception of your hotel or our emergency number: +212 (0) 661998138

  • While there is a limited risk of Malaria in some parts of rural Morocco (remote areas of the sub-Saharan desert), it is not recommended to take anti-malarialdrugs for travellers following standard city-based itineraries.

  • No vaccinations are officially required for entry to Morocco. It is recommended that Tetanus and Hepatitis A vaccines are up-to-date.

  • For up to date information on latest health and vaccination recommendations, please contact your doctor.

Electricity

  • Voltage is 220 volts AC, 50Hz.

 

Photography

  • As in all foreign countries, it is considered polite to adhere to and show respect for local customs. 

  • Urban culture is greatly influenced by Western culture, but in rural areas traditional values and customs survive. 

  • You should always ask permission before taking photographs of local people as offence could easily be taken. Some locals may ask for a few Dirhams when being photographed.

 

Arrival and Departure Formalities

  • If your nationality is not on the following list, then you should contact a Moroccan Embassy and apply for a visa.

  • You do not need a tourist visa if you belong to one of the following countries: Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Bahrain, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Congo (Rep. of),Cote d'Ivoire, Denmark, European Union, Finland, Guinea, Hungary, Iceland, Indonesia, Korea (Rep. of), Kuwait, Libya, Liechtenstein, Mali, Malta, Mexico,Monaco, New Zealand, Niger, Norway, Oman, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland, Tunisia, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States of America, Venezuela.

  • On your first arrival in Morocco, you will be given an entry number on your passport. Please keep it handy as it will be required in the hotels.

   

Local Food

  • Moroccan dishes are famously flavoursome. The most common ones to try are: Tajine (a thick vegetable and meat stew), DjajjM'hamer (chicken stuffed with couscous, almonds and raisins); and Mchoui (roasted or grilled mutton). 

  • Of course, mint tea is very typical in Morocco and is available wherever you go.

 

Local Handicrafts

  • Favourite buys for visitors to Morocco include Moroccan carpets, leather goods, traditional dress and other local handicrafts.

 

Other Notes

  • As you will have a driver at your disposal for most of your stay you will not need local taxis very frequently.

  • If you do need to use one during your leisure time, petits taxis are the most common: carrying up to 3 people, they are ideal for short journeys. Bear in mind that these taxis are usually shared, unless you specify and agree on a price at the beginning of your journey. At night there is a compulsory surcharge of 50%. You would normally not pay more than 20 Dirham for a 10 minute ride during the day.

  • Larger minicabs and Mercedes are used for travel between towns and these vehicles can hold up to 6 passengers.


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